Tag Archive for: construction

Spotlight on Women in Construction: Firsthand Insights from FBR's Female Candidates


Celebrating Women in Construction Week! This is a time to recognize and celebrate the invaluable contributions of women in the Construction Industry. Despite being historically male-dominated, women have been breaking barriers, shattering stereotypes, and making strides in various roles within the Construction sector.

In this special blog edition, we’ve had the privilege of interviewing several of our inspiring female candidates. Their stories, experiences and insights shed light on the challenges they’ve overcome, the successes they’ve achieved, and advice for women looking to get into construction.

Interview 1:

Meet Emma Arnold, currently working as an Assistant Site Manager placed by one of our Consultants, Cameron Whitley.

What is your role and what does it entail?
Assistant Site Manager – My job role is to help the Site Manager in delivering construction projects to completion. I generally supervise the project from 1st fix through to handover, this includes organising both trades and materials while also making sure that health and safety regulations are adhered to at all times.

What has it been like being a woman in construction, and how do you see the industry changing?
I have worked in the construction industry for almost 9 years now and I have never had any problems with being the only woman on a site. I think that women on construction sites is becoming more common and generally most men are not concerned about this, I do believe it is down to the individuals you come across rather than the industry as a whole.

What advice would you give other women looking to start a career in Construction?
My advice would be to just go for it, most of the men I’ve come across are more scared of you than you are of them.

Experience on working with me and FBR Recruitment in general.
I first dealt with Cameron from FBR last year when I got made redundant from my previous role, he was very helpful and friendly. He helped me find a new job within one month so my unemployment time was to a minimum.

Interview 2:

Meet Emma Richards, a Contracts Manager placed by FBR.

What is your role and what does it entail?
Contracts Manager for a fit-out and refurbishment company which involves raising orders for sub-contractors, suppliers and materials for each project, material take-offs, putting together the Health & Safety paperwork and site plans as well as liaising with clients, designers/architects and site teams. Projects can range from empty offices to live, multi-occupancy buildings and sites.

What has it been like being a woman in construction, and how do you see the industry changing?
I began in the construction industry back in 2000 starting with an NVQ 3 in Carpentry & Joinery, from there working as a machinist making doors, windows, frames and kitchens etc. I then decided to look into Site/Contracts Management completing various qualification and gaining valuable experience mainly within the shop fitting and fit-out sectors. I have been very fortunate to have worked with some amazing people and companies that have both been supportive and encouraging throughout my career.

The industry has changed a lot over the years and will continue to do so. It is already working hard to encourage more women to pursue a rewarding career within the sector. There’s much more consideration taken and provisions put in place on site as standard and there is now much more choice in site clothing, boots and PPE etc. which is really encouraging. I certainly look forward to the next 20 years and seeing how much further we can progress as an industry.

What advice would you give other women looking to start a career in Construction?
If it’s something you would like to do and are passionate about just go for it, don’t over think it, there really are so many options and avenues you can follow, something to suit everyone from cost management, site management, engineering, trades, designing, architecture, health and safety etc. If you look for the opportunities, they are there to take, be pro-active and enjoy!

Conclusion

As we conclude this blog honouring Women in Construction, we extend our gratitude to the women who shared their stories and insights. These journeys serve as reminders of the resilience, strength, and talent that women bring to the Construction Industry every day.

If you’re a female looking for work within the Construction Industry, don’t hesitate to reach out to us. Or to browse some of our current available jobs visit our Jobs Board.

Let’s continue to champion diversity, promote inclusivity, and create opportunities for women to thrive in Construction and beyond.

Together, we can build a brighter, more equitable future for all.

FBR – Construction, Residential, Civil Engineering and Trades and Labour Recruitment Services in the South East of England

We are a recruitment agency serving the South East, Home Counties & South Coast of the UK, including Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Dorset, Essex, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Surrey, East & West Sussex and Middlesex. Whether you are a construction contractor, housing developer, civil engineering contractor, client or job-seeking candidate, contact FBR Recruitment for all construction recruitment and staff requirements — we’ll be very happy to help you.

At FBR, we believe in more than just building construction careers; we believe in building communities and making a positive impact in the world around us. As part of our commitment to foster a culture of giving within our organisation, we are delighted to announce Abby’s Heroes as our Charity of the Year for 2024.

Abbys Heroes: A Beacon of hope for Children Battling Cancer:
Abbys Heroes originated in honour of a courageous young girl called Abby, who valiantly battled cancer from 2013. During her fight, Abby went through extensive treatment including 23 rounds of chemotherapy, 50 days of radiotherapy, as well as stem cell harvesting and surgery. But in 2014, Abby was declared in remission and resumed her education and cherished hobbies.

Sadly, the cancer resurfaced towards the end of 2014. Faced with the limitations of current research, Abby’s medical team found themselves without further viable options and she tragically passed away on the 29th of May, 2016. In response to this profound loss, the charity was established to honour her memory and support children and families in similar situations.

Founded with a mission to provide financial, practical, and emotional assistance, they have become a beacon of hope for those navigating the difficult journey of paediatric cancer.

Why Abby’s Heroes?
Choosing Abby’s Heroes as our Charity of the Year aligns with our core values of compassion, community, and making a meaningful difference in people’s lives. Opting for this smaller, local charity allows us to make a meaningful impact on raising awareness for their cause, while also enabling us to directly observe and be part of the tangible positive changes taking place within our community.

We are excited to contribute to the incredible work Abby’s Heroes does on a daily basis.

Our Commitment:
Throughout the year, FBR will commit to supporting Abby’s Heroes through various initiatives, fundraisers and volunteer opportunities. We also aim to raise awareness around the crucial role that organisations like Abby’s Heroes play in providing support to families affected by childhood cancer.

How you can get involved:
We have set up a Just Giving page with a fundraising target for the year of £2,500, we invite employees, clients, candidates and the community to join us in supporting Abby’s Heroes. Whether it’s making a donation, participating in fundraising events, or volunteering your time, every contribution makes a significant impact on the lives of children battling cancer and their families.

Stay tuned for updates on our social media channels and company newsletters to learn more about the upcoming events and initiatives. A few of these being a fire walk, abseiling the Spinnaker Tower and the New Forest Marathon.

Together, we can build a better future for these brave children and their families.

Closing thoughts:
At FBR, we are excited about the opportunity to make a positive difference through our partnership with Abby’s Heroes. By working together, we can build a legacy of compassion, support, and hope for those facing the toughest battles.

Thank you for joining us on this meaningful journey as we construct not only careers but also a brighter and more compassionate future for our community.

Here is the Just Giving link if you wish to donate and help support this incredible cause:
https://www.justgiving.com/page/fbrrecruitment-abbysheroes

The ultimate goal of a recruitment agency is to match the right talent with the right job

How do recruitment agencies work? A guide to the different ways recruitment agencies work, including how to match the right candidate to the right job role, fees, etc.

Recruitment agencies work in various different ways. The ultimate goal of a recruitment agency is to match the right talent with the right job role and company. Call us corporate matchmakers if you will. 

The way that recruitment agencies make their money can be different, some recruiters work on a flat fee if the candidate they sourced was selected for a role. Other recruiters take a percentage pay based on the annual salary for the role. Recruitment agencies are running a business after all, however, there are good recruitment agencies and less than ideal ones. 

It is important to speak to the recruitment agency you are looking to work with, as a candidate as well as a business. If they are not transparent in how they make money or withhold information from you; that’s a huge red flag and you should consider your options.

Ultimately finding the right recruitment agent is key to ensuring that the right talent is in the right roles. Recruiting is expensive, even if you as a business decide to do it in house. That is why working with a recruitment agency can be beneficial as we work to align your needs as a business with the best talent on the market. 

Now we understand how the basics of a recruitment agency works, what does a recruitment agency do to make this happen?

Sourcing Candidates

One of the tasks that recruitment agencies need to do is source candidates. This can be done by outreaching online to those who have set public profiles as interested/open to work. 

Additionally, we have secure databases that we are able to use to help us match current job offerings with potential candidates. This allows us to match up both the candidate’s interests and requirements with the company looking to recruit.

Advertising Job Roles

Another thing recruitment agencies do is advertise roles they are recruiting for. Recruiting new talent is time consuming and takes a lot of effort for companies. Using a recruitment agent to advertise and pre-vet candidates helps those companies as well as proves beneficial for the candidates themselves. 

Supporting both Companies and Candidates

Recruitment agencies also work to support both companies looking to recruit as well as candidates. 

It is important for us as a recruitment company to align the company we are recruiting for with the right candidates and talent. We are there to answer any questions and support candidates with interview preparation and more. 

Our team are also experts in European recruitment and are able to assist with information relating to work permits and additional qualifications.

How to Work with Us as a Candidate

There are two ways in which you as a candidate can work with us. The first way is to view our jobs board and apply for any jobs relevant to your experience and skills. This is a great way if you are actively looking for new opportunities. 

The second way you can work with us is to contact us and submit your information and be included in our database. This way our recruiters will be able to access your information should an opportunity arise that you are suited for. 

Sourcing a Recruitment Agency as a Business

If you are a business looking to work with a recruitment agency there are some things you should consider. 

The first consideration is whether your recruitment agent is an expert in your industry. Not every recruitment agency understands the nuances of specific industries and this can make it difficult to ensure the right candidate is selected. At FBR, we are experienced in recruiting for construction roles and the construction industry as a whole. We understand the importance of specific qualifications such as CSCS and NEBOSH. 

Another important consideration is how they select candidates. Some recruitment agents select candidates by waiting for a submission. This can take time and if your recruiter isn’t working hard to find the right talent, are they the best recruiter for you? 

Ultimately working with a recruitment agency should be easy and stress free for both parties. At FBR, we work with both candidates and companies to ensure that the selection process is easy and accessible. We focus on the right candidates and talent for the right company. 

FBR – Office & Construction Recruitment Services in the South East of England

We are a recruitment agency serving the South East, Home Counties & South Coast of the UK, including Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Dorset, Essex, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Surrey, East & West Sussex and Middlesex. Whether you are a construction contractor, housing developer, business or job-seeking candidate, contact FBR Recruitment for all construction recruitment and office staff requirements — we’ll be very happy to help you.

 

Learn how to start a career in Construction Project Management with FBR Recruitment

Learn how to start a career in Construction Project Management with FBR Recruitment
Starting a career in construction project management can be daunting for anyone. Like with all careers, there isn’t one route that works for everyone. The way people find their career path varies.

Speak to anyone in any industry and they will have their own story. There are however, some consistencies across multiple industries and routes into work. They begin with entry level roles, and move deeper into other avenues of education and on the job training.

Entry level construction project management roles

As with all industries, there are entry level roles that can help you get started in your career in construction project management.

The first entry level construction project management role would be a trainee position. This would require you to have some experience within the construction industry. However you will not be solely responsible for all the tasks of a construction project manager. You will learn from the people above you as you train.

Another entry level position is a project assistant. This role would require you to assist the project manager in their tasks and help with the overall workload.

How to start a career in construction project management

There are two identifiable routes to starting your career in construction project management. No matter how many people you speak with; they will have taken one or a combination of the two routes into their careers.

Route one – Academic

The first route you can take into construction project management is the academic route. This is where you tailor your education after GCSEs to build towards your career in construction project management. From specific A levels such as Maths, IT and Business courses into undergraduate degrees and postgraduate degrees at University.

You may then also wish to take on various other degrees and accreditations within the industry to further bolster your academic records.

This route isn’t for everyone as it requires the time spent in education where coursework and exams are part of the process.

Route two – Work your way up

An alternative route is through experience and working within the construction industry directly. Here you will look at more vocational ways of training. That would be through on the job training with additional courses to supplement your qualifications. Or alternatively, some construction firms may offer apprenticeship level courses.

Working your way up through the ranks holds a lot of merit as you have direct experience working in each aspect of the projects you would be managing in the future.

The vocational way of getting into construction project management may take more or less time depending on the industry at the time. When there is an increase in demand for construction project managers you may find yourself thrust into the position.

Going the vocational route doesn’t mean you won’t have access to additional courses which you can take to supplement your experience. These courses can be done in your own time and are less pressured than traditional academic routes.

No matter how you want to get into construction project management, finding the right recruitment agency to help you in your career is essential. Here at FBR, we work with you to find the right role with the right company.

View our Jobs Board now to see what roles we have on offer. Already found something you like? Contact us now.

Read about the role of a Construction Project Manager

Read about the role of a Construction Project Manager
A construction project manager is an important role in all construction projects. Having someone who understands each phase of the project and is actively involved in ensuring it is on budget and completed within the deadline is a necessity.

Construction project management requires a few key skills, knowledge of construction sites. This will ensure that the project is run safely. Leadership skills, to help keep the team on track with the necessary tasks. Attention to detail and excellent communication skills.

This role is suited to those with a can-do attitude and high amounts of persistence and determination. Here at FBR, we believe that when you understand what is required of you in a job, only then can you shine and make the right decisions. For more details on a Construction Project Manager Job Description and Salary read our blog.

Why do construction projects need a project manager?

Construction projects are huge projects that require various phases. Each phase is essential to getting construction projects completed on time and within budget. A project manager is key to ensuring that construction projects are kept on schedule and run with all the health and safety requirements in mind.

There are lots of people who work on a construction project. A construction project manager is the one who understands each part of the project and roles the team has to play.

What are the differences between a project manager and construction project manager?

There are a few differences between a project manager and a construction project manager. The main difference is that a project manager doesn’t always work on a construction site. A construction project manager almost always works on the construction site and managers the project as it’s being built. There may be days where a construction project manager isn’t on site, but they may be few and far between.

The skills that a project manager needs are all the same regardless of area. However, a construction project manager also requires in depth knowledge of health and safety regulations that need to be met on site. This is to ensure that the team is kept safe in their working environment as well as ensuring that the project meets the regulatory standards necessary.

Day to day tasks of a project manager in construction

The day to day tasks of a project manager in construction can vary. However, each day it is essential that a construction project manager checks in with any deliveries or budget requests. This helps keep the project running smoothly as well as on budget.

A construction project manager will also delegate tasks to other team members and ensure that the tasks are completed. If there are any issues within the project it will be the responsibility of the construction project manager to use initiative and leadership skills to help solve the problem.

Understanding the details of a role is essential to making the right career decisions. Here at FBR, we believe that there is the right role for everyone. When you find the right job you can continue to grow and evolve in your career. For more information on all our roles visit our Jobs Board.

Found a role that’s right for you? Contact our construction recruitment experts.

Insight into construction project managers job and salary

Insight into construction project managers job and salary
Learn all about a construction project manager job description and salary in FBR’s detailed job guide. Understanding a role is essential in finding the right job. From a detailed job description to salary information as well as qualifications and skills, you will find out all you need to know about construction project management.

Construction project manager job description

The main responsibilities of a construction project manager are to ensure a project is run smoothly, on time and within budget.

You will be in a leadership role which means that you will need to delegate tasks and help organise each phase of the project. This is an important aspect of the job as there are many different tasks and responsibilities.

Attention to detail is essential as well as communication. You will be required to speak with various people across the board to provide updates on how the project is going.

Being on site and ready to tackle the challenges of a construction site is necessary. There are various health and safety protocols which will need to be followed and can vary depending on the site and project. Understanding the intricacies of this is important as you will ultimately be responsible for your own safety and the team.

Construction project manager salary

A construction project manager salary will vary depending on a few factors, such as; experience, qualifications, and most importantly location.

Location plays a large role in any job’s salary. Is it important to note when looking at project management roles in construction that you take into consideration your own location, qualifications, and experience.

The average salary for a construction project manager in the UK is around: £61,769. This can vary depending on location and experience. The minimum salary for a construction project manager is £37,500, whereas the maximum salary for a construction project manager is reported at £89,700.

Project manager qualifications

As with many roles it is essential to have qualifications in order to perform a job. In particular, the construction industry requires a few key qualifications.

It is becoming increasingly common for construction companies to require each individual obtains a CSCS card. You can learn more about them here.

University construction project management courses

One of the more traditional routes of education is to obtain a construction project management degree from participating universities.

As a rule of thumb, you will need 2-3 A levels or equivalent in a relevant field or a first degree in a relevant subject. The A levels will provide you access to an undergraduate course, whereas a first degree will provide you with access to a postgraduate course.

Depending on the university you may find either: Construction Management, Project Management courses. Alternatively, Business and IT courses can cover similar subjects and provide a broader field of job opportunities should you change your mind further in the future.

College construction project management courses

For those who prefer a more hands on approach; college or training providers might be more suitable. These work on a NVQ qualification basis, which means that you obtain qualifications with more hands-on experience.

You will be able to begin an NVQ straight after secondary education. You will need 4-5 GCSEs graded between 4-9 (that is equivalent to C-A* in the old grading system). These qualifications will gain you entry into a level 3 NVQ course.

Alternatively, if you have studied A levels at college you will be able to move directly onto a level 4 or 5 NVQ course.

There are various NVQs you could do from Business Improvement Techniques, to Project management. Always speak to the training provider to ensure that you are entering the right course.

Soft Skills

There are many skills required to work in construction project management which are not always found through a course.

The soft skills refer to skills which are typically unable to be assessed on any qualification or proven otherwise.

Soft skills that are required for project management are;

  • Communication skills
  • Organisational skills
  • Logical and Critical thinking skills
  • People management

These skills are gained through experience and can always be worked upon.

Are you looking for your next role in construction project management? Contact FBR now or view our Jobs Board for more information.

Day in the life on a construction site

Day in the life on a construction site
Knowing what a typical day looks like for any job is extremely important. Having the information on what can happen, and what to expect will enable people to align their own requirements with a specific role or industry.

A construction site is a busy and sometimes dangerous environment. Being prepared for what happens on site is essential for all of those who work within the construction industry.

Who works on a construction site?

There are many people who work on construction sites. Each person has their own role to play to ensure that the project is either completed, managed correctly, or carried out to the highest safety standards.

A project manager will be on hand to ensure that the project runs smoothly. They will be the connection between the client and the site manager. It will be the role of a site manager to ensure that each team who is working on the site has what they need to carry out their job. They will also ensure that the site is safe to work on and follow all compliance guidelines.

General construction crew will be responsible for doing the manual labour. There are different specialities within this sector, from brick laying, demolition, warehouse installation, and more.

There may also be electricians, plumbers, and even decorators on site at any point throughout a project.

Typical day on a construction site

There is no typical day on a construction site, depending on the phase of the project how the day is structured may vary. However, there are some consistencies when working on a construction site.

At the start of the day there may be a meeting, this will either be a project brief or checking in with the team on where each task is currently at. After everyone is settled in and knows what they need to do and where the project is at, most will then begin their tasks.

Depending on your role within the project your tasks may vary. For construction crew, you will be expected to prepare the site for safe working conditions. As well as perform many of the manual labour tasks. This can be moving site equipment safely with the relevant machinery, or building aspects of the project.

If you are within the project management department you will need to ensure that the project is running on time and smoothly. You will be responsible for budgeting, as well as obtaining the relevant items and materials for the ground crew to perform their role.

It is important to take the relevant breaks based on your role. Legally everyone is entitled to a break, and there are certain requirements that must be met. Each site has different restrictions, from working with chemicals, site conditions and temperatures and more. Ensure that you take the legally required breaks, otherwise it could be detrimental to your health as well as land your employer in hot water.

As you continue to work through each phase of the project you may be asked to provide updates and reports to various stakeholders. This is key information that allows a project manager to keep track of the progress as well as highlighting any issues that you may face.

At the end of the day there may be a progress update. This will be with your site manager, again these reports allow the project manager and site manager to see how the project is progressing.

Before the end of the day, the site will need to be cleared and tidied. This is important for many health and safety reasons. Equipment needs to be maintained and looked after as well as securing any materials that aren’t in use.

Every day is different on a construction site, understanding the health and safety rules you must abide by as well as the details within your role will help you navigate this fast paced environment.

If you are looking for your next role in construction, contact FBR recruitment today. Our team are experts in construction recruitment, and will help you find the right role. View our jobs board now.

Learn about the pros and cons of working in construction

Learn about the pros and cons of working in construction
Every job has pros and cons, it’s the natural balance of life. We aren’t one to sugar coat something. It is important for all candidates to understand the roles they will be getting into. Whether that is understanding the salary and industry insights or knowing what a typical day in the job looks like.

Knowing what to expect within a role enables you as a candidate to make the right decision. As well as us in recruitment placing the right candidates.

Construction can be a complex and fast paced industry, so there are bound to be both pros and cons of working in construction. Let’s look at some of the benefits and not so fun parts of construction.

What are the cons of working in construction?

In order to not end this blog on a downer, let’s first look at the cons of working in construction. Because, let’s be honest, no job is perfect all the time.

1: Hours

The hours can be seen as a benefit for some, but typically the days in construction start early. Again, this all depends on the role you are in but if you are one of the construction crew you will most likely start your work as soon as possible. For some, the early day is great but for those who enjoy a later start to the morning it isn’t too fun.

2: Hard labour

Not to say that no one else works hard, but there it takes a different type of person to do manual labour associated with many construction roles. The implementation of machinery and such is making many roles easier to manage; many construction roles require physical labour. Be prepared.

3: Location

Some projects may require you to travel. This can be anywhere from an hour’s drive or maybe they will require overnight stays. Depending on how the construction company works, you may be asked to travel further distances than anticipated. This for some can be difficult to manage. So it is important to be honest with the employer or recruiter and find out how much travelling you may need to do.

What are the pros of working in construction?

So now we’ve looked at some of the not so good things about construction, and even then some may not see those as issues. Let’s look at some of the pros of working in construction.

1: Variety

One of the benefits of construction is that no two projects are alike. Each project will have different problems to solve, different working conditions, and the client is different too. This makes it extremely engaging for many people.

2: Opportunity

Working in construction provides many opportunities for advancing your career. There are so many different roles within the construction industry that you can continue to grow and advance in any area you set your mind to. The wealth of opportunities available means that there is something for everyone.

3: Not tied to a desk

Being in construction means that you are out and about and active. This means that you are always moving and doing something, for those who can’t stand sitting at a desk for hours; a job in construction is perfect for you.

What is the best role in construction?

In our opinion, there is no best role in construction. What makes a role the best, is one that fits you and what you need from a job. Making sure that you are working in an industry that you enjoy, with the people that you get along with is what will take a job, to the best job.

Knowing what to expect from any role is important. If you are looking for a job in construction and have questions about the industry, speak to our expert recruitment agents. Our team at FBR is here to help you find the right role for you.

Construction workers automated out of jobs

Construction workers automated out of jobs
With so much going on around AI and technology, it is no wonder that people ask if construction workers can be automated out of a job.

While there are many benefits to technology and automation; that doesn’t automatically equal job replacements. There are many aspects of construction work that will need to be carried out by humans. However, with the advancement of technology and AI, we may find that the way we go about construction jobs changes and evolves.

As technology becomes more advanced and capable, many processes can be streamlined and sped up. This will free up time for employees to really focus on things that matter, this can make a huge difference to construction work.

So let’s look into how technology can be used to enhance construction jobs?

How can technology be used to enhance construction jobs?

There are three key ways technology can be used to enhance construction jobs, don’t worry these will make your work-life easier.

Reduce physical labour

One way is to reduce the amount of physical labour needed in the construction process. Automated machines and robots can be used for various tasks like digging, carrying, moving and lifting materials, etc. This saves time and energy from having to do all of this physical labour manually.

This also can create safer work environments for construction workers. As we all know there are many tasks that have to be carried out in specific ways in order to be done safely. With the introduction of specific machines, we can reduce workplace accidents in the construction industry and make it safer for all those involved.

Improve 3D printing and materials

Another way is to make use of 3D printing technology in order to create construction materials faster and with more accuracy. 3D printing can be used for creating models, prototypes, and even final products that are cheaper, lighter, and stronger than traditional materials.

This will result in more time and effort being put into the design process to ensure the end result is exactly right. Having more time to design and plan will be extremely beneficial for many construction job roles, in particular for those who are design engineers, CAD draughtsmen, and more.

Project management and the use of AI

The use of automation and AI is becoming increasingly popular in the field of construction management. This allows for better project planning and scheduling, as well as more accurate estimating of costs and time frames. Automation can also make it easier to track progress, reduce paperwork and automate the billing process.

This helps streamline processes and allows project managers, construction managers, and others to spend time focusing on the things that matter.

There are so many ways that technology can be used to improve construction jobs, from reducing physical labour to using 3D printing for better materials to using AI for better project management. People only fear what is new, and technology advancing has never replaced jobs entirely, only changed the landscape of work.

If you are looking for a new challenge in construction contact our team at FBR today. We focus on finding the right role for the right person. Our team of experts is able to help guide you through the recruitment process, from checking relevant qualifications and more. Contact us today.

Do millennials want to work in construction?

Do millennials want to work in construction?

Do millennials want construction jobs? This is quite a common question in our industry and it’s no wonder that with how the job market consistently changes.

In past generations manual labour jobs were common. Now with the rise in technology more office based jobs take up the market share. So the question is do we think millennials don’t want construction jobs?

It is important to remember, that the youngest millennial is in fact mid twenties. So millennials are not the youngest generation in the workforce. This offers clarification on who we are talking about.

It may surprise you to hear that it’s not all on millennials. As the younger generation reaches the workforce, what they are looking for from an employer is different to the ones before them.

Work Life balance is key for many younger generations, and businesses in all industries need to consider this when recruiting new employees. Millennials are the generation who have been told to work smarter not harder. This means if there is a way to make a role simpler then they will explore that. Businesses who remain trapped in old processes may lose out to new talent.

So the question isn’t that millennials don’t want to work in construction, but how can construction companies recruit millennials?

How have construction jobs changed?

Since the beginning of time construction has always been a part of life. From building houses, highways, industrial estates, warehouses, and more.

Before technology many tasks in construction relied upon a manual process. From taking measurements, surveying lands, and more. As technology evolved, so did the construction industry. Measurements became digitalised, as did plans and designs, even now surveys can be completed with various technology such as drones.

As technology continues to evolve so will the landscape of construction roles, as long as businesses embrace these changes.

Improving with technology and other advancements will ultimately change the way a construction job is done. This means gone are the days of pencils, hauling and handling with only a wheelbarrow.

So it is not so much that millennials aren’t working in construction roles. They are simply working in a different capacity to what a construction role previously entailed.

How to appeal to younger generations in the job market

Younger generations, and the younger millennials look for work life balance and flexibility. There are many roles which offer this and as such construction companies need to consider ways in which they can also offer flexibility.

Another key thing to consider when looking to recruit younger generations, is what could their career path look like? Gone are the days of chasing a job title and income for status. Millennials and those younger want to make an impact and improve the world around them. If they can do this through their job then they will be far more fulfilled and stay in jobs longer.

Using this, businesses will need to look at ways they can streamline their internal processes and make better business decisions that have positive impacts on the environment and world.

Additionally, while money isn’t everything millennials look for. They know their worth and expect to be paid for it. This means you can’t expect minimum salaries for high flying jobs.

The construction industry is a fast moving industry in terms of recruitment. Having a recruitment agent who understands your needs is essential to finding the right talent. Here at FBR recruitment, our experts are on hand to make sure you find the right person for the right job. Contact us today.